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Fabrication Process

3D Printing Lets Kids Combine LEGO And Lincoln Logs Into One Toy

3D printing increasingly has the potential to generate unique experiences on an individual level by empowering consumers to use or create products in new ways. Instead of being beholden to the designs or intentions of a generalized product, buyers will soon have the ability to tailor products to their specific needs.

http://www.psfk.com/2012/03/3d-printed-lego-lincoln-log.html

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Fabrication Process

Rael San Fratello, Emerging Objects, ExOne – Involute Wall

The involute wall is a prototype for thermal mass and acoustic dampening in a massive 3D printed sand structure. The involuted surfaces reduce resonance in the room, by absorption and redirection of sound waves. The massive 600lb 3D sand print presents the opportunity for surfaces to serve as thermal mass while keeping much of the wall in shade—ideal for hot climates with extreme temperature shifts.

 

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Fabrication Process

Topology optimisation of material microstructure

This project is aimed at establishing effective and efficient computational algorithms for optimising the microstructures of materials and composites with single or multiple functional properties.

New and advanced materials are of critical importance to the aerospace, automotive, medical and other industries.

Using the simple BESO technique, we have successfully developed optimisation algorithms for the topological design of cellular and composite materials considering a wide range of design objectives, including maximising bulk modulus, maximising shear modulus, maximising thermal conductivity, maximising magnetic permeability, maximising electrical permittivity, and maximising or minimising a combination of these properties. We have also used the same technique to design microstructures for functionally graded materials, and for orthotropic materials with prescribed ratios between effective stiffnesses in three directions.

https://www.rmit.edu.au/research/research-institutes-centres-and-groups/research-centres/centre-for-innovative-structures-and-materials/projects/topology-optimisation-of-material-microstructure/

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Fabrication Process

TABSOLAR

THERMAL FLOW THROUGH VACUUM UHPC PANELS

Im Rahmen des BMWi-Forschungsprojekts TABSOLAR untersucht das Fraunhofer ISE gemeinsam mit den vier Industriepartnern G.tecz Engineering UG (haftungs-beschränkt), Betonfertigteile Spürgin GmbH & Co. KG, Visiotex GmbH und Zehnder GmbH sowie dem Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) ein neu-artiges Konzept für multifunktionale Bauelemente aus Ultrahochleistungsbeton (UHPC). Das Projektziel besteht darin, hieraus durchströmbare Komponenten zu entwickeln. Dies können neben Solarabsorbern auch Flächenheiz- oder Kühlelemente sein, z. B. Wandflächenheizungen oder thermoaktive Bauteilsysteme (TABS)

http://www.gtecz-engineering.com/innovations/thermal-panel-tabsolar/

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Fabrication Process

Building Bytes: 3D Printed Ceramic Bricks

In keeping with the ceramic 3D printing theme, I want to talk about Design Lab Workshop who have come up with Building Bytes. During a six week residency at the European Ceramic Work Centre, they focused on 3D printing ceramics for large scale construction. Using desktop 3D printers, they created these printable bricks.Each Building Byte can be unique without complicating its fabrication process. The Building Bytes were made from a liquid slip cast recipe of earthenware ceramics typically used for casting molds.

http://www.replikat3d.com/tag/bricks/

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Fabrication Process

Can Lab3D Connect All of the Bricks in the 3D Printed Wall?

There are infinite possibilities to implement 3D printing in construction, architecture, and efficient housing. So many, in fact, that we have only begun to scratch the surface. So, although projects such as the 3D Printed Canal House in Amsterdam (or Winsun’s 3D Printed buildings in China, for that matter) remain extremely fascinating, there is a lot of research yet to be done in the field. That is what studio Lab3D, also based in the Dutch capital (of 3D printing) is doing with several different approaches.

The studio was founded by designers Hans Lankhaar and Bram van den Haspel, who are both very much focused on and fascinated by the possibilities of 3D printing. They start from the idea that “the world is on the verge of a new era of product design and product distribution.” Lab3d aims to contribute to this transition offering clever and feasible 3D designs and services that fit the context of the real world.

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2015/07/06/can-lab3d-connect-bricks-3d-printed-wall/

http://www.lab3d.nl

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Fabrication Process

PolyBrick

There’s a lot you can do with a 3D printer, even large-scale objects like houses. The typical approach to 3D print building is to use crane-like arms to print parts of houses layer by layer. But this 3D printing technology limits the size at which one can build, and the enormous 3D printer takes a lot of space and is difficult to transport. Researchers at Sabin Design Lab, Cornell University and Jenny Sabin Studio have come up a new method to 3D print large-scale forms using customized digital tools, low-cost printing materials and 3D printed interlocking component based systems called PolyBricks.

PolyBricks are nonstandard high-resolution ceramic bricks that are similar to cinder blocks, but requires no additional adhesives or mortar. The researchers looked to traditional wood joinery techniques as a means of interlocking adjacent components and developed customized tapered dovetail shape lock the bricks to one another.

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20140623-researchers-create-3d-printed-polybrick-interlocking-bricks-for-building-large-structures.html

http://www.3dprinterworld.com/article/brick-by-brick-how-3d-printing-can-revolutionize-construction

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Fabrication Process

Emerging Objects has big, bold plans for 3D-printed rooms

“Durability” and “strength” are about the last words I would ever associate with 3D printing. But I’m not talking about the small, plastic trinkets you would print out with your MakerBot. This is Emerging Objects, a small fabrication studio in Oakland, CA that’s researching how to 3D-print using materials like wood, ceramic, newspaper, concrete, and salt.

Everyone is focusing on machines, and we’re interested in what machines can make,” Emerging Objects co-founder Ronald Rael explained to TechHive. “We saw a limitation in what a machine can make because of the medium, and so we wondered if we could reformulate that media to suit our own architectural agendas to print big.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2046172/emerging-objects-has-big-bold-plans-for-3d-printed-rooms.html

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Fabrication Process

shape and form

about

shape and form is a small design group based in munich. shape and form specializes in customized and exclusive articles, inspired by nature, shaped with innovative 3d software and produced by latest 3d printing technology. articles are produced in limited editions not exceeding twelve pieces per design. all products can be specially tailored to individual needs and desire.

philosophy

“there is a difference between ‘shape’ and ‘form’. we use the words loosely to mean the same thing, the image of what we see or look at; but even with the words ‘see’ and ‘look’ there differences. looking infers a desire to study and make critical comment; to see is to receive an image. the outward contours of something make up shape but beyond that received image an imperative of geometry and pattern, mixed in with instinct and inspiration, seems to hammer out ‘form’. there is this intangible concept underlying form, more to do with creativity than visualisation. trapped within its own outward layer, shape has no depth, but form has shape and depth: and structure in its organisation and power of synthesis, allies itself with form.

http://shapeandform.de

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Fabrication Process

Building Bytes – 3D printed ceramic bricks for architecture

Combining a traditional building material (ceramics) with a new fabrication technique (3d printing) to re-think an ancient building component (bricks), Building Bytes demonstrates how 3D printers will become portable, inexpensive brick factories for large-scale construction.

The power of Building Bytes is its accessibility. The fabrication starts with a standard desktop 3D printer, a technology that is quickly becoming available to designers worldwide. A customized extrusion system is attached that can accommodate any liquid material, such as concrete or earthenware ceramics (shown). This simple adaptation allows users to source local building materials that are both available and familiar.

Building Bytes also offers designers and architects far more opportunity for ingenious design than a standard extruded brick. Printed bricks can have complex exterior surfaces, permitting interlocking or curvature of the final structure, while their internal structure can be engineered to significantly lower their weight or increase their strength at stress points for a particular build. And while the fabrication of the bricks is new, builders throughout the world will be familiar with using them in construction.

The first phase of this research was conducted during a 8-week residency at a ceramic work center. Four brick types were developed to test and demonstrate to potential of this fabrication system and its applications in interior and exterior architecture: 1) Honeycomb Bricks – modular honeycomb stackable bricks; 2) X-Bricks – for vertical tiling; 3) Ribbed Bricks – for columns and towers; 4) Interlocking Bricks – for domes and arches.

The fixed limitations (the print area of a desktop 3D printer, the capacity of the material storage system and the material properties of clay) of the project led to the development of a small architectural component: bricks. While the material and building unit are ancient and fairly universal, this project proposes a new fabrication technique.