Categories
Fabrication Process

Robotic Concrete Printing by Studio RAP

Studio RAP developed a 3d-printer for architectural concrete in collaboration with concrete manufacturer Bruil. The combination of custom hardware and software will enable a whole new range of possibilities for architects in terms of shape, colour and texture. Studio RAP and Bruil expect to start production on a large scale within two years.

 

Status:        Work in Progress
Year:           2016
Partners:   Bruil

https://studiorap.nl/portfolio/robotic-concrete-printing/

Categories
Fabrication Process

Digital Construction Platform (DCP)

The 3D Printed Hemi-ellipsoidal Dome is a first-of-its-kind architectural-scale structure robotically fabricated with the Digital Construction Platform (DCP).  Using the Mediated Matter group’s Print-In-Place construction technique, an open domed structure with a diameter of 14.6m and a height of 3.7m was manufactured over a print time of 13.5 hours. The geometry of the test print is a hemi-ellipsoidal dome design, where the wall thickness of the formwork cavity decreases with height. This enables optimized structural use of the cast material while providing maximum internal volume. This test print demonstrates many of the benefits of both the Digital Construction Platform and the Print-In-Place process, including the ability to rapidly print large-scale structures, produce complex digitally controlled curvatures, and fabricate on-site.

Categories
Fabrication Process

Beton auf der BAU 2017

Auf über 1.000 Quadratmetern zeigte das InformationsZentrum Beton gemeinsam mit 14 Partnerunternehmen die ganze Vielfalt des Baustoffs Beton. Insbesondere die aktuellen Entwicklungen rund um die Themen Nachhaltigkeit, Energieeffizienz, Gestaltung und Innovation standen im Blickpunkt.

Das Centrum Baustoffe und Materialprüfung und der Lehrstuhl für Holzbau und Baukonstruktion der Technischen Universität München forschen gemeinsam an drei unterschiedlichen Verfahrensvarianten des 3D-Drucks mit Beton. Beim Extrusionsverfahren werden Zement, Gesteinskörnung und Wasser vorab gemischt und anschließend einzelne Schichten durch Ablegen von Frischbetonsträngen gedruckt. Beim Verfahren des selektiven Bindens werden die Komponenten erst beim Druckvorgang gemischt.

https://www.beton.org/aktuell/beton-auf-der-bau-2017/

Categories
Fabrication Process

Viridis3D Launches RAM10™ 3D Printer Materials Development Kit!

Viridis3D LLC has released an open materials development system designed to make R&D fast, cheap, and easy – called the RAM10™ 3D Printer Materials Development Kit.

The new RAM10™ Materials Development Kit is very simple in construction and has very fast test cycle times with a small build volume and includes: fluids manifold, electronics, and spreader bars. The RAM10™ uses ViriPrint™, which is the same software as the production printers.

According to Viridis3D CTO, Jim Bredt, “Viridis3D has taken a very different tactic from the older large format printer manufacturers. The RAM10™ 3D Printer Development Kit allows users to change powder, binder, firing parameters, tubing, and powder deposition subsystems — enabling distributed development of new materials sets. The similarities allow scale-up to the larger systems to be as seamless as possible.”

“We’re very eager to see the products that come out of the academic and industrial sectors as they start to use this materials development system,” said Will Shambley, President of Viridis3D. We’re hoping that by making this easy-to-use development kit, that we will be able to create a thriving development community around the bigger production RAM printers.”

The first system was installed recently at Palmer Manufacturing & Supply, Springfield OH. Ken Strausbaugh’s efforts on binder research were quickly rewarded. “It was extremely easy and fast to get the RAM10™ up and running. With a little guidance form Viridis3D, we had a new ink working in just a few days,” said Strausbaugh.

http://viridis3d.com/news/news-10.htm

Categories
Fabrication Process

ZUtA Labs – Mini Robotic Printer

After finding success on Kickstarter, ZUtA Labs is piecing together its mobile robotic printer.

Small enough to fit into the palm of your hand, the four-inch wireless device makes it easy to produce images on the go.

The printer rolls back and forth over a piece of paper, until the on-screen image is recreated in about a minute. The ZUtA Robotic Printer integrates with an app, which enables it to print what you see on your phone. (see full Tech Crunch article here)

www.zutalabs.com

 

Categories
Fabrication Process

Viridis3D

Viridis3D LLC is an all-inclusive supplier of Additive Manufacturing Technology for industrial applications. We sell complete systems of materials, 3D printing machines, robots, software, and the training needed to successfully deploy functional solutions for metal casting, ceramics, and composites applications.  Viridis3D is releasing the fastest, most flexible robotic 3D printing platforms in the industry.

The Viridis3D mission is to create value in manufacturing markets for Additive Manufacturing, by developing application specific hardware and materials solutions.  Our development efforts are a combination of in-house research and design, as well as partnerships with a network of vendors, customers, and universities. Many new applications start with a customer need – so we love to hear about what other want to do with 3D Printing, even if it isn’t something that can be currently achieved.

http://www.viridis3d.com/index.htm

Categories
Fabrication Process

This Robot Is a Loom For Weaving Carbon Fiber Into Rocket Parts

There’s plenty of carbon fiber in space right now. It’s the best bet we have for making spacecraft lighter—and it’s going to be key on deep space missions where every gram of food, water, and fuel is carefully planned. But making these parts isn’t easy, or cheap. Prototyping and testing new carbon fiber designs is slow, expensive, and labor-intensive. And as NASA pushes towards putting humans into deep space, it will need to make huge leaps in manufacturing to develop the spacecraft capable of these long, distant journeys.

This summer, NASA got a tool that will make prototyping those parts way easier. It’s a 21-foot robotic arm whose head is made up of 16 rods that look like oversized sewing spools, attached to a long, 40-foot track that allows the robotic arm to slide around a model.

http://gizmodo.com/this-robot-spins-carbon-fiber-threads-into-rocket-parts-1722022204

Categories
Fabrication Process

COMPOSITE SWARM

The Composite Swarm installation designed by Roland Snooks is an architectural prototype exploring the relationship of robotic fabrication, composite materials and algorithmic design. The complexity of the form and the excess of ornament make the prototype structurally efficient and minimize the amount of material used. The prototype is 2.5 meters tall, with a surface thickness of less than 1mm. A swarm algorithm based on the self-organizing behavior of ants was developed for the project to negotiate between and compresses surface, structure and ornament into a single irreducible form.

http://www.kokkugia.com/Composite-Swarm

http://www.suckerpunchdaily.com/tag/kokkugia/

Categories
Fabrication Process

Meet the Future of 3D-Printed Buildings

These prototype parts and systems are made of metal, concrete, and plastic and use computational design to push the limits of form while leaving room to scale.

A 3D-printing arms race is pushing makers to build bigger and better with ever-more-resilient materials and increasingly precise extrusion techniques. That could change, however, as the mark of success in additive manufacturing shifts from size to scale and architects and designers take it upon themselves to hone the technology at the building-component and systems levels and bring their results to market. The trio of parts below shows how materials like concrete, plastic, and metal are being used to create 3D-printed components that, if applied at scale, could find their way to the jobsite in the not-so-distant future.

http://www.architectmagazine.com/technology/meet-the-future-of-3d-printed-buildings_o