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Fabrication Process

Fiber-Reinforced Nylon

Fiber-Reinforced Nylon materials are designed to print parts with the strength of metal. Thanks to Markforged’s continuous fiber fabrication process, you can now 3D print parts with a higher strength-to-weight ratio than 6061-T6 Aluminum, up to 27x stiffer and 24x stronger than ABS.

Available materials include Carbon, Kevlar and Fiberglass reinforced nylon, allowing you to optimize your print for strength, stiffness, weight and temperature resistance.

https://www.3dhubs.com/material-group/fiber-reinforced-nylon

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Fabrication Process

Woven carbon-fibre chair

In this movie filmed in Amsterdam, Moooi co-founder Marcel Wanders discusses the woven carbon-fibre chair he designed with Bertjan Pot, which the Dutch brand relaunched this year as a bar stool.

Moooi’s Carbon Chair – based on a prototype by Pot that Wanders helped develop into an industrially produced piece of furniture – is woven from a series of carbon fibres impregnated with epoxy resin to create a strong and light structure.

The seat is produced by hand-weaving black strands of epoxy-soaked carbon fibre around a mould, which set to form a rigid structure that is suitable for both indoor and outdoor use.

“It allows a super light structure to be super strong,” Wanders says in the movie, which Dezeen filmed for Moooi in Amsterdam.

“It was important for us to make a transparent seat, so we weaved it in a classical way with wires impregnated with epoxy.”

Read more on Dezeen: http://www.dezeen.com/?p=824998

https://www.moooi.com/products/carbon-chair

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The Future of Construction Carbon Concrete: Hard shell – lightweight core

With over 100 million cubic meters used each year, steel-reinforced concrete is the most important construction material in Germany – for now. There’s a modern alternative on the horizon: Instead of steel, reinforcement is provided by carbon fibers, which are four times lighter than steel, offer six times the load capacity and don’t rust.

C3 (Carbon Concrete Composite) is the name of the carbon fiber-reinforced concrete project which is now slowly moving out of its infancy. It is the biggest construction research project in Germany and has received government funding of around 45 million euros. The project team includes specialists from our TechCenter Carbon Composites. Christoph Klotzbach, head of the TechCenter, says: “Initial applications show we’re on the right track.”

 

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Fabrication Process

Carbon-fiber epoxy honeycombs mimic the material performance of balsa wood

As turbine makers produce ever-larger blades—the longest now measure 75 meters, almost matching the wingspan of an Airbus A380 jetliner—they must be engineered to operate virtually maintenance-free for decades. In order to meet more demanding specifications for precision, weight, and quality consistency, manufacturers are searching for new sandwich construction material options.
Now, using a cocktail of fiber-reinforced epoxy-based thermosetting resins and 3D extrusion printing techniques, materials scientists at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have developed cellular composite materials of unprecedented light weight and stiffness. Because of their mechanical properties and the fine-scale control of fabrication (see video), the researchers say these new materials mimic and improve on balsa, and even the best commercial 3D-printed polymers and polymer composites available.

https://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2014/06/carbon-fiber-epoxy-honeycombs-mimic-material-performance-of-balsa-wood

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140625151548.htm

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Fabrication Process

This Robot Is a Loom For Weaving Carbon Fiber Into Rocket Parts

There’s plenty of carbon fiber in space right now. It’s the best bet we have for making spacecraft lighter—and it’s going to be key on deep space missions where every gram of food, water, and fuel is carefully planned. But making these parts isn’t easy, or cheap. Prototyping and testing new carbon fiber designs is slow, expensive, and labor-intensive. And as NASA pushes towards putting humans into deep space, it will need to make huge leaps in manufacturing to develop the spacecraft capable of these long, distant journeys.

This summer, NASA got a tool that will make prototyping those parts way easier. It’s a 21-foot robotic arm whose head is made up of 16 rods that look like oversized sewing spools, attached to a long, 40-foot track that allows the robotic arm to slide around a model.

http://gizmodo.com/this-robot-spins-carbon-fiber-threads-into-rocket-parts-1722022204

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Fabrication Process

COMPOSITE SWARM

The Composite Swarm installation designed by Roland Snooks is an architectural prototype exploring the relationship of robotic fabrication, composite materials and algorithmic design. The complexity of the form and the excess of ornament make the prototype structurally efficient and minimize the amount of material used. The prototype is 2.5 meters tall, with a surface thickness of less than 1mm. A swarm algorithm based on the self-organizing behavior of ants was developed for the project to negotiate between and compresses surface, structure and ornament into a single irreducible form.

http://www.kokkugia.com/Composite-Swarm

http://www.suckerpunchdaily.com/tag/kokkugia/

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Fabrication Process

The wild weird world of carbon fiber

How can something that starts out like cloth end up being so strong and light?

Carbon fiber is properly described as a “composite material,” a term that is used to describe any substance with multiple components that combine in interesting ways to produce a material with complex, desirable properties. Most of our time on the GE campus was spent in the center’s composite manufacturing lab, and we were surrounded by tons of different composite materials, from glass to metals—but carbon fiber was the thing we focused on.

Carbon fiber’s standout properties, and the reason that you see it showing up in body panels of cars and in jet turbines, is that as a finished material it can be made both much stronger and much lighter than equivalently sized metal parts. “Stronger” here refers to a multitude of different measurement. For example, as explained here, carbon fiber has a tensile strength (that is, it resists being stretched) roughly four times greater than steel and eight times greater than aluminum. It is also stiffer (it resists bending) than steel or aluminum by a significant amount. These gains in strength are accompanied by a drastic reduction in weight: typically, a carbon fiber part weighs only a third as much as a steel part of the same volume.

 

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matthew strong weaves carbon fiber eames sofa

the eames fiberglass shell armchair of the late 1950s went through a number of changes in term of its form and thickness, in order that its supporting strength was increased. however, the final model of the shell was almost ¾ of an inch thick, making it impractical and difficult to move. at that point, it was abandoned, and only one upholstered model was ever completed. extensively researching the historical and theoretical relationships between furniture and architecture at the henry ford museum, cranbrook academy of art and MoMA archives, matthew strong offers a design that re-imagines the original eames prototype through a combination of modern materials and traditional craft techniques.

http://www.designboom.com/design/matthew-strong-carbon-fiber-eames-sofa-03-16-2015/

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Fabrication Process

carbon fibre

Pinterest-board by Marta Krivosheek

https://www.pinterest.com/martakrivosheek/fibre-carbon-%2B-glass/

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Fabrication Process

c-LITH: Carbon Fiber Architectural Units

c-LITH is the reconsideration of the architectural building unit through the exploration of new composite techniques and materials. Our project develops individual components that exploit the strength, lightness, and variability possible with carbon fiber filaments when paired with computation, digital fabrication, and hand assembly.

Traditionally, architectural units made of brick or concrete are small and multiple, heavy, difficult to vary, and are much better in compression than tension. Using carbon fiber filaments to create variable units allows for larger individual units that can vary in both shape and structural performance as needed. Our units, pound for pound, have higher capacities in both compression and tension and therefore impact the design in both the vertical and horizontal dimensions. Most importantly, however, our units address the use of carbon fiber at the scale of architectural production.

The images below are of the project installed @ the Taubman College Liberty Annex Gallery as part of the Research Through Making Exhibit, March 12 – April 20, 2014.

http://www.area-architecture.com/blog/?p=426